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 Consumer Confidence Water Report

 

2016 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

Montoursville Borough Water Works

PWSID# 4410175

                  This report contains important information about your drinking water.  Translate it, or speak with someone who understands it.

                  Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua beber.  Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

             We're pleased to present to you the 2016 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water.  We’re pleased to report that our drinking water meets federal and state requirements. 

           If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Ginny Gardner, at the Montoursville Borough Office at 570-368-2486. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the first Monday of each month beginning at 7:00 in the borough office.

           Our water sources are four municipal wells and one spring.  Two of the wells are located on the west side of town and one in the center of town, south of Broad Street. Our spring is located across the river at the base of the mountain.

           Montoursville Borough Water Works routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. This table shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31, 2016. All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some constituents.  It's important to remember that the presence of these constituents does not necessarily pose a health risk.

           Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

           In this table you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions:

 

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter - one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) - Picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Action Level (AL) –the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. 

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) The “Goal” (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Minimum Residual Disinfectant Level – The minimum level of residual disinfectant required at the entry point to the distribution system.

 

Chemical Contaminants

 

Contaminant

MCL in CCR Units

 

MCLG

Level Detected

Range of Directions

 

Units

Sample

Date

Violation

Y/N

Sources of Contamination

 

**Chlorine

 

MRDL=4

 

MRDLAG=4

 

.73

 

.17 – .98

 

ppm

 

2016

 

N

Water additive used to control microbes.

 

Nitrate

 

10

 

10

 

 

1.14

 

1.14

 

ppm

 

2016

 

N

 

Runoff from fertilizer use.

Entry Point Disinfectant Residual

 

 

Contaminant

Minimum Disinfectant Residual

Lowest

Level

Detected

Range

Of

Detections

 

 

Units

 

Sample

Date

 

Violation

Y/N

 

Sources of Contamination

 

Chlorine

 

.40

 

.47

 

.47 – 1.17

 

ppm

 

2016

 

N

Water additive used to control microbes.

Lead and Copper

 

Contaminant

Action Level (AL)

MCLG

90th Percentile Value

 

Units

# of Sites Above AL of Total Sites

Violation

Y/N

Sources of Contamination

 

Lead

 

15

 

0

 

1.27

 

ppb

 

0 out of 20

 

N

 

Corrosion of Household Plumbing

 

Copper

 

1.3

 

1.3

 

0.806

 

ppm

 

0 out of 20

 

N

 

Corrosion of Household Plumbing

 

           **distribution system disinfectant residual.

          

           All sources of drinking water are subject to potential contaminants that are naturally occurring or manmade.  Those contaminants can be microbes, organic or inorganic chemicals, or radioactive materials.  Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

            The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

• Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

  Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

• Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

• Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.

• Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

            In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

           Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a dependable water supply we sometimes need to make improvements that will benefit all of our customers. These improvements are sometimes reflected as rate structure adjustments. Thank you for understanding.

           We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future.